News

Levitt Bernstein appointed as lead designer and architect for Cambridge Junction regeneration

Thu 14 Nov

Levitt Bernstein study

Cambridge Junction and Cambridge City Council are excited to announce the appointment of award-winning architects Levitt Bernstein for the regeneration of the city arts centre.   

Levitt Bernstein will lead the team that will draw up plans to upgrade and expand the complex’s existing performance spaces, while also creating a masterplan exploring options for new complementary uses within the leisure park site. The project, planned to complete in 2024, aims to attract new audiences to Cambridge Junction while also securing its long-term organisational resilience and financial and environmental sustainability. 

Masterplan and design

Cambridge City Council recently approved funds of £250,000 to engage a lead design team to produce a masterplan and redevelopment designs for Cambridge Junction to RIBA Stage 1. The tender for this work was issued in April 2019 and following a procurement process, overseen by Cambridge Junction and Cambridge City Council, Levitt Bernstein has been appointed as lead designers for the project.

This project will be transformational for the Cambridge Junction and the arts and cultural offer in the city. There is a clear ambition for a landmark building to be developed, that will increase accessibility, usability, sustainability and resilience as well as being architecturally important. Both Cambridge Junction and Cambridge City Council have declared Climate Emergency and environmental sustainability will be a key part of the project.

Levitt Bernstein

Levitt Bernstein has a track record of delivering special places for performance and art of all kinds for over 40 years. Amongst the projects the company has worked on are the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester, LSO St Luke’s in London, The Congress Theatre in Eastbourne and recently Colston Hall in Bristol. The team which will be working on the project were awarded ‘Masterplanning and Public Realm Architect of the Year’ in 2018 by Building Design Magazine and will led by Gary Tidmarsh, Chairman at Levitt Bernstein.

£49,900 grant from The National Lottery Heritage Fund for 30th birthday reminiscence project

Thu 14 Nov

Stage diver at Senseless Things gig 16.02.93 (CREDIT Richard Chambury)

 Stage diver at Senseless Things gig 16.02.93 (Richard Chambury)

Cambridge Junction has been awarded a The National Lottery Heritage Fund grant of £49,900 to deliver Lost Nights & Love Songs, an arts and community project exploring the history of the much-loved arts centre.

Created in part as a response to the illegal party scene in the county, Cambridge Junction was built on the site of a former cattle market and opened by broadcaster John Peel in 1990 on 14th February 1990.

Over the last 30 years Cambridge Junction and its locality have changed enormously, and the large-scale project will collect people’s memories and create a physical archive of ephemera, engage with audiences and local school children and present creative displays and events. Lost Nights & Love Songs will be delivered in partnership with the Museum of Cambridge who will host the exhibition from the project in 2021. 

More information on Lost Nights & Love Songs can be found here

 

 

 

Welcome to our new Head of Development

Tue 24 Sep

 

We’re delighted to announce the appointment of Liz Hughes as our new Head of Development. Having said a fond farewell to her predecessor Clare O’Hara - who leaves us for an exciting new role as Director of the Cowley Road Trust in Oxford - we’re thrilled to welcome Liz to Cambridge Junction. Liz will start with us at the end of October, and lead on fundraising for our community and creative learning programmes and ambitious future plans for developing the building and organisation.

Liz has worked in the cultural sector for over twenty years. She joins the Cambridge Junction from the Norfolk & Norwich Festival where she was the Executive Director, leading on organisational change, finance, communications and development. Prior to this Liz was the coordinator for the capital redevelopment of Kettle’s Yard House and Gallery. Previously Liz has worked as a consultant for clients including the University of Cambridge Museums and Cambridge City Council. From 2007 – 2012 she was the Creative Programmer for the East of England for London 2012, working on the London 2012 Festival and Olympic Torch Relay. 

Liz moved to Cambridge in 2004 to work for the Department of Culture, Media and Sport’s regional cultural consortium, Living East. Before this she worked in Westminster for Arts Council England and across the UK for specialist arts and education sponsorship consultancy Kallaway. She is looking forward to joining Cambridge Junction as we prepare to celebrate our 30th birthday in February 2020 and to play a key role in realising its plans for the future.

Mothers Who Make

Thu 16 May

A quietly growing revolution comes to Cambridge

A collective of local artists who are mothers are bringing a national initiative to Cambridge next month. Mothers Who Make is a monthly peer support group for mothers who are artists & makers, in any discipline and at any stage on their creative paths.

Every kind of maker is welcome- professional and/or passionate – writers, painters, performers, producers, musicians, bakers, crafters, architects, historians …
Every kind of mother is welcome- biological, adoptive, step, surrogate, foster, grand, great grand, to be …

Children are encouraged to attend too and are integrated into the meeting, for the dual roles of mother and artist are recognised and given equal value within all MWM events.

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Mothers Who Make began in 2014, with Matilda Leyser (Mother/Theatre Maker/Associate Director Improbable Theatre) as a way to explore the experiences and challenges specific to being both a mother and an artist. Matilda said:

“I noticed many parallels between the two roles [of mother and artist]: both are concerned with creativity and play, both require stamina, patience and sensitivity. Both are fuller than full time. This is work that will not be left behind at 5.00pm, work that wakes you up at night, concerned with fundamental questions of identity, looking after and making sense of who we are, where we have come from, who we might become. Mothers and artists are as vital, arguably more so, than bankers and politicians to our future. Despite this, both jobs have precious little status in the current cultural climate.”

There are currently regular peer-support groups meeting at 16 major arts-related venues in different regions, with 20 other groups in the process of starting across the UK in 2018. Mothers Who Make has received Arts Council funding to develop the initiative and commission 7 artists.

‘We’re absolutely thrilled Cambridge is joining the Mothers Who Make movement and having the support of the Cambridge Junction as the host venue. These monthly meet-ups will provide peer to peer support and we look forward to them growing into a valuable resource for creative women in Cambridge.’ Ramesh MacKay, Cambridge Hub- Coordinator.

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  • Wed 19 June, 10am-12pm
  • Wed 17 July, 10.30am-12.30pm

Cost: £5/£3 or contribute whatever you can (cash)
No booking required, just turn up.

For more information please visit:
Mothers Who Make Cambridge Hub Facebook page
or message Rebecca Burman (Cambridge Hub Coordinator) on: 07974357273

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MWM Cambridge Hub is facilitated by a collective of local mother – makers:
Abi Wills, Rebecca Burman, Sasha Smith, Ramesh MacKay, Tonka Uzu, Beatriz Aymat, Laura Pearson-Clark, Lluna Gallego, Sarah Dobson.

 

VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED!

Wed 10 Apr

We’re looking for volunteers to welcome and assist our customers during the festival. In exchange for your time we can offer you a free festival wristband!

For more information on volunteering at the festival click HERE